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WorldTripeDay (1)

World Tripe Day: 3 ways to prepare this SA delicacy

Celebrating World Tripe Day 

 

Once considered a delicacy in many parts of the world before losing out to prime cuts of meat, this love-it-or-hate-it dish is making a comeback to the culinary world. On the 24th October, the world celebrates Tripe Day, an ode to the dish prepared from the 'offal' of animals.

 

South Africa in particular has a rich history when it comes to tripe, with our melting pot of cultures all preparing the dish in its own special way. Below we’ve listed the top ways this interesting dish is prepared in our country. 

 

Afrikaans and Cape Malay ‘pens en pootjies’

Historically, offal was a significant element in Afrikaner food.  Liver, for instance, is a favourite, and is a crucial ingredient in that very traditional dish called ‘skilpadjies’, which is made with lamb’s liver wrapped in the fatty membrane that surrounds the kidneys of the animal.

 

‘Pens en pootjies’ - in English it’s ‘tripe and trotters’ - is a mix of tripe and the lower part of the animal’s leg.  The dish uses lamb or mutton. The most common way of cooking is to spice it up with curry and other spices, and then to add potatoes, giving it the substance of a solid stew. When plated, it is served on rice or pap, a starch made from ground maize.

 

A similar popular Cape Malay dish uses a number of additional spices typical of Cape Malay cuisine to give it extra pizzaz: cinnamon sticks, turmeric, grated ginger, roasted masala, and chilli powder are the tastes that give the dish its unique Cape Malay flavour.

 

Traditional Zulu tripe 

Traditionally known as mogudu, the Zulu method of preparing tripe is similar to that of the global standard. In a pot, ox tripe is placed to boil in water and vinegar for a few hours, in  order to soften the offcuts. Spices and herbs including ground cloves, cinnamon and tomato puree are used to add flavour to the dish. Once all the ingredients are brought together, it is best served over a steaming serving of pap, or steamed bread. 

 

This has become a well-known favourite traditionally, and is even served up at restaurants like BON Hotel Empangeni in Zululand, where Chef Khulani prepares oxtail tripes for guests. 

 

Durban Indian tripe recipes

Many people of Indian origin - largely those whose ancestors settled in what we today know as KwaZulu-Natal - still identify with the food of South India.  And tripe is a definite favourite among the varied dishes of this type of cuisine. 

 

Owing to religious beliefs, the meat of the cow is not generally used so the tripe used in these dishes would generally be from sheep.  Tripe Curry, known as Ojri Delights, is well-known, and it is prepared in a similar way to the tripe of the Cape Malay community but with slightly different spicing.  Interestingly, mint is included in this version of Tripe Curry.

 

Perhaps less well-known beyond the community are Tripe Kabaabs.  The tripe is boiled and then minced or chopped so that it can be formed into a kabaab - a walnut-sized ball of meat that has been mixed with spices and various different kinds of flour (such as pea flour, mealie meal and cake flour) for binding. The kabaabs are then fried or grilled, and make for a delicious and tasty meal.

 

If you haven’t yet extended your cuisine to include delicious offal dishes, tripe is a good way to start.  It’s easy to make and it’s economical so give it a try!

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